Archive for January, 2015

Don’t Let Bacteria Spoil the Party

Football

During Super Bowl parties, we may eat more often from dishes of food that have been sitting out for some time. Mayonnaise in noodles, egg and potato salads and unwashed fruit can deliver sickening doses of numerous bacteria. Turkey and chicken can be a significant source of Salmonella. Even lettuce and spinach in salads can harbor E. coli. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control estimates that 50 million Americans each year get sick from foodborne illnesses. As many as 3,000 people will die. With 50 million reported cases a year, how is the U.S. Food and Drug Administration going to protect us from home-cooked meals?

There is something that we can do to protect ourselves. Laboratory testing and clinical studies have shown that a strongly enhanced, aqueous silver colloid will kill E. coli, salmonella, staph and other food-borne bacteria. Drinking one ounce, waiting 30 minutes and drinking another ounce can stop even the most severe occurrence of food poisoning without antibiotics. This technique has been shown to be so effective against Salmonella typhi that it was recently delivered for humanitarian aid to health clinics in Haiti.

We can enjoy dining and protect our families from food poisoning during sporting events and throughout the new year. Just have enhanced aqueous silver colloid on hand to administer the antidote at the first sign of stomach pain or belly ache.

For more information, call 888-465-4404 or visit NaturesRiteRemedies.com.

Fare Sharing

Rideshare

Three is the Perfect Number

With increasing traffic congestion and escalating gas prices, carpooling has become a way of life in America’s biggest cities. Now new high-tech innovations such as ridesharing apps that make the process more efficient have given rise to a new class of riders known as “slugs”. The term was originally coined by bus drivers trying to distinguish between commuters awaiting carpool drivers and people standing in line for the bus, just as they used to stay vigilant for fake bus tokens known as slugs.

In many urban centers with specific lanes dedicated to cars with three occupants (HOV-3), having clearly marked entry and exit points benefits everyone – drivers move faster and save gas; riders get to work; and the environment gets a break. The magic number is three – something about having just two occupants doesn’t seem as safe to many people, although the concept is the same. If the worst happens and no drivers show up, there’s always the bus.

Source: Grist.com

Natural Eye Care for Aging Dogs

Dog Eyes

Many owners of middle-aged and older dogs worry about their pets’ declining eyesight. Cloudy eyes are of particular concern, but that is not necessarily a sign that a dog is going blind, advises Shawn Messonnier, a doctor of veterinary medicine practicing in Plano, Texas.

“While cataracts strike many older dogs, a more common condition is lenticular or nuclear sclerosis, a thickening of the lens of the eye,” says Messonnier. He explains that this normal change causes the eye to appear somewhat cloudy or gray, similar to a cataract. However, unlike a cataract, this type of sclerosis does not interfere with the pet’s vision. “Veterinarians can easily tell the difference between these conditions,” he says. “No treatment is necessary for lenticular sclerosis; cataracts are often treated with carnosine drops or with surgery.”

For prevention, Messonnier suggest minimizing toxins that can cause inflammation throughout an animal’s body, not just the eyes. This means using blood titer testing instead of annual vaccinations, reducing the use of flea and tick chemicals, using natural pet foods and minimizing the use of conventional medications.

He also recommends feeding a pet nutrients that contribute to health and reduce inflammation and cellular damage, including fish oil, probiotics and antioxidants like bilberry, which supports eye health.

Wonder Wave

algae

Natural Fiber is Stronger than Steel

Nanocellulose, a material derived from tree fiber and some grain stalks, could now be sourced from blue-green algae in sufficient quantities to cost-efficiently create ultra-thin media displays, lightweight body armor, a one-pound boat that carries up to 1,000 pounds of cargo, and a wide range of other products. R. Malcolm Brown, Jr., Ph. D., a biology professor at the University of Texas at Austin, presented his team’s findings at an American Chemical Society conference as a major step toward “one of the most important discoveries in plant biology.”

Brown’s method uses genes from the family of bacteria that produces vinegar and secretes nanocellulose. The genetically altered algae, known as cyanobacteria, are entirely self-sustaining. They produce their own food from sunlight and water and absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, offering a natural way to reduce this major greenhouse gas.

Brown says bacterial noncellulose can be used to create ballistic glass, aerospace materials or even wound dressings, because it retains its stiffness and strength even when submerged in liquid. Its most obvious application would be in paper, cardboard and display industries.

Source: TheVerge.com

Eco-House

Green Home

Green Homes Can be a Bargain

One of the most innovative, energy-efficient houses in the United States has been built in the District of Columbia’s working-class Deanwood neighborhood, which has struggled with foreclosures. The Empowerhouse, a residence that produces all of its own energy, consumes 90 percent less energy for heating and cooling than a conventional dwelling.

Empowerhouse was designed using “passive house” technologies as part of the Solar Decathlon design competition, held on the National Mall in 2011. It’s the work of students at The New school, in New York City, and Stevens Institute of Technology, in Hoboken, New Jersey, in partnership with Habitat for Humanity and the D.C. Department of Housing and Community Development. Each duplicable unit costs a locally affordable $250,000.

Bringing the community into the design process for both the house and landscape is the basis for collaboration on additional projects in the neighborhood, including a new community learning garden. The designers remark that it all plays a part in creating social sustainability, an aspect often left out of development programs.

Source: Parsit.Parsons.edu