Archive for February, 2015

Holy Batastrophe!

Bat

Wind Turbines a Kill Zone for European Bats

Bats are vital natural pest controllers, saving the use of millions of pounds of pesticides by eating insects, but many species are declining across Europe, despite being protected, because wind turbines are seriously harming their populations. “It’s most common in migratory species, with around 300,000 bats affected every year in Europe alone. Bats are found dead at the bottom of these turbines. One option is to reduce turbine activity during times of peak migration,” says Richard Holland Ph.D., of Queen’s University Belfast, co-author of a study published in Nature Communications that sheds light on the problem.

Scientists have discovered the first known example of a mammal to use polarization patterns in the sky to navigate in the greater mouse-eared bat. The study demonstrates that the bats use the way sunlight is scattered in the atmosphere at sunset to calibrate the internal magnetic compass that helps them to fly in the right direction.

Holland says, “Bees have specially adapted photoreceptors in their eyes, and birds, fish, amphibians and reptiles all have cone cell structures in their eyes which may help them to detect polarization, but we don’t know which structure these bats might be using. Anything we can do to understand how they get about, how they move and navigate will be a step forward in helping to protect them.”

Source: Natural Environmental Research Council (nerc.ac.uk)

Imperiled Parks

Park

Laws Permit Oil and Gas Drilling in Iconic Public Lands

News that the U.S. Department of Interior will allow drilling for oil and gas in a proposed wilderness area in southern Utah’s Desolation Canyon puts a spotlight on the practice. A report by the Center for American Progress reveals that 42 national parks are at rise, including 12 where oil and gas drilling is currently underway and 30 where it could be in the near future.

Among the threatened wild places are iconic American national parklands, including Grand Teton, in Wyoming, Mesa Verde, Great Sand Dunes and Dinosaur National Monument, in Colorado, Santa Monica Mountains, in California, Glen Canyon, in Arizona, Carlsbad Caverns and Chaco Canyon, in New Mexico, Everglades and Gulf Islands, in Florida, Arches and Canyonlands, in Utah, and Glacier, in Montana.

The reality is that all public lands, including national parks and wildlife refuges, are potentially open to oil and gas leasing unless they are designated as “wilderness”, the highest form of land protection designated by the government.

Source: The Wilderness Society (Tinyurl.com/NationalParkDrilling)

Apple-Cheddar Brunch Souffle

Apple

Yields 8 Servings

  • 3 slices gluten-free or sprouted grain bread, torn into 1-in pieces
  • 6 eggs
  • 1 cup milk (flax, coconut, almond or goat)
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 1 tsp nutmeg
  • 4 Tbsp grass-fed butter
  • 3 large sage leaves
  • 6 apples, cored and sliced into wedges (about 8 per apple)
  • 1 cup grated goat’s milk cheddar cheese

Arrange bread on a baking sheet. Toast until light brown. Set aside.

Preheat oven to 350* F.

Whisk eggs, milk and spices together until some small bubbles form on surface.

Heat a skillet on medium heat. Melt 3 Tbsp of butter and drop in sage leaves. Allow butter to bubble, not burn.

Drop apple wedges in and stir, cooking for 2 to 3 minutes until apples are slightly soft. Remove apple mixture from heat. Remove sage leaves.

Use 1 Tbsp butter to grease a 9-inch springform pan, deep baking dish or Dutch oven. Arrange 1/3 of bread in a layer on the bottom. Sprinkle 1/4 of grated cheese on top. Spoon 1/3 of apple mixture on top. Repeat twice. Pour egg mixture on top.

Back on middle rack for 30 minutes. Sprinkle remaining cheese on top. Bake for an additional 15 minutes.

Courtesy of Tania Melkonian, EATomology.com

A Healthy Approach to Intestinal Maintenance

Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a condition in which too many and the wrong kinds of bacteria inhabit the small intestine, or small bowel, usually due to another condition that interferes with normal intestinal activity. Bacteria are allowed to stay overlong and multiply or even spread backward from the colon into the small intestine. The results may include constipation, bloating, abdominal pain, fatigue and even anemia, because iron and vitamin B12 are absorbed here.

Allopathic medicine usually kills off the overgrowth with antibiotics that tend to stay in the intestinal tract. The small intestine is then reseeded with healthy probiotics to establish the proper balance of gut bacteria essential to the absorption of nutrients and the production of some natural vitamins.

Steven Frank, founder of Nature’s Rite, advises that as a more natural alternative, some naturopathic practitioners are using an enhanced aqueous silver colloid to kill off the overgrowth before reseeding. According to the Encyclopedia of Herbal Medicine, after using either technique, it helps to ingest herbs such as plantain, licorice, marshmallow and slippery elm bark, as well as aloe, to heal the damage.

For more information, call 888-465-4404 or visit NaturesRiteRemedies.com.